Saturday, March 25, 2017

Beware of Seeking Help from the Wrong Place


2 Kings 1:3 - But the angel of the Lord said to Elijah the Tishbite, Go and meet the messengers of the king of Samaria and ask them, Is it because there is no God in Israel that you are going to inquire of Baal-zebub, the god of Ekron?

King Ahaziah had gotten injured in an accident and was afraid he would die. Instead of seeking help from God, he sent a messenger to a foreign land to inquire of their false god if he would recover from his injury. Elijah, the prophet of God, met the messenger on the journey and asked “Is it because there is no God in Israel that you are going to inquire of Baal-zebub, the god of Ekron?”

Time and again throughout the history of God’s people God had proven Himself to them. God had worked miracles on their behalf. It was inconceivable in light of all that God had done for His people that they would seek advice from a false god. Yet, that is what King Ahaziah did.

As we think about our own lives, we have also witnessed God’s power time and again. How many times have we had some close call in our lives and knew someone must have been watching out for us? How many times have we prayed in a time of crisis and God came through for us? God has been there for us in both big and small ways our entire lives. It is inconceivable that we would seek help from any other source but God. Yet, like King Ahaziah of old, we often do that very thing. We call physic hotlines. We read fortune cookies. We watch shows on television in which pop-psychologists give us the latest fad in human thinking, even if it goes completely against God’s Word. We dabble in new age philosophies and Eastern religions seeking truth. We ask friends who do not know the Lord for advice instead of seeking it from the Bible or from trustworthy pastors.

In the biblical story, King Ahaziah ended up dying because he sought help from the wrong source. It may sound cruel for God to not help him in his situation, but remember, King Ahaziah did not ask God for help. He asked a false god for help and got exactly the kind of help that false god had, which was nothing. Essentially, God decided to give King Ahaziah what he asked for, and it did not end well. As we consider our own relationship with God, why do we think God will help us when we have called upon everyone but Him in our distress? What if God let all the false hope and bad advice we sought come to fruition in our lives? It would be a disaster.

Thankfully, our God is a God of grace and often helps us when we do not deserve it. But I do think from time to time He withholds His help while we seek all those other dead ends. He wants us to see that those dead ends lead nowhere, so that when we finally come back to Him, we will be more faithful than we were before. If we tarry too long in turning back to Him, all we have left is false hope, false comfort, and false help that this world has to offer. It only leads to disaster. Let us commit ourselves to turning back to the true God of the universe today and serve Him with all of our hearts.

Lord, remind us to seek help from You in times of need instead of looking to the false hope this world offers. Amen.

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This devotional is from the book “Heavenly Mundane” by Dr. Terry W. Dorsett. Dr. Dorsett has been a pastor, church planter, denominational leader and author in New England for more than 20 years. He is a happy husband, a proud father and adoring grandfather. He is a cancer survivor and believes that God works powerfully through times of suffering. He writes extensively and you can find all of his books at:




Friday, March 24, 2017

God Always Wins in the End


2 Kings 6:16-17 - Elisha said, “Don’t be afraid, for those who are with us outnumber those who are with them.” Then Elisha prayed, “Lord, please open his eyes and let him see.” So the Lord opened the servant’s eyes. He looked and saw that the mountain was covered with horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha.

Elisha was being pursued by the king of Aram, one of Israel’s long-time enemies. The king was upset because God had been revealing the king’s battle plans to Elisha through supernatural means. Elisha would then tell his own people those plans so they could intervene. The king of Aram sent horses, chariots and a massive army to surround the city where Elisha lived. The next morning when one of Elisha’s assistants woke up and saw the army, he could not imagine how they would survive the coming attack. Elisha responded by saying that “those who are with us outnumber those who are with them.” Elisha then asked God to open the eyes of his assistant so that the young man could see the supernatural army of horses and chariots of fire that surrounded Elisha’s position. Then God used a miracle to lead the attacking army away and as a result, the Aramean’s stopped raiding the Israelite territory.

Though many centuries have passed since that event took place, God is still doing supernatural events around us. We often get so focused on our problems and difficulties that like Elisha’s servant, we wonder in despair how we will endure. In those times we need to remember that God has legions of angels at His command. We need to remember that God has never been defeated in all of history. God has a plan and is working that plan out for ultimate good in the universe. We need to remember that God’s forces always outnumber the enemy and in the end, God’s side always wins. We need our eyes to be opened so that we can see what God is doing around us and take comfort in the power He has at His disposal to do things in ways we could have never dreamed. Our hearts do not need to be troubled. We need to believe in Jesus and look to Him for our hope!

Lord, help us trust You even when it seems humanly impossible for our situation to work out well. Amen.

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This devotional is from the book “Heavenly Mundane” by Dr. Terry W. Dorsett. Dr. Dorsett has been a pastor, church planter, denominational leader and author in New England for more than 20 years. He is a happy husband, a proud father and adoring grandfather. He is a cancer survivor and believes that God works powerfully through times of suffering. He writes extensively and you can find all of his books at:




Thursday, March 23, 2017

Don't Be Discouraged, Better Days are Coming!


2 Chronicles 36:23 - This is what King Cyrus of Persia says: The Lord, the God of heaven, has given me all the kingdoms of the earth and has appointed me to build Him a temple at Jerusalem in Judah. Whoever among you of His people may go up, and may the Lord his God be with him.

The Old Testament kings of Israel were a mixed group. Though some honored God, most did whatever they wanted to with no regard for how it impacted their relationship with the Lord. Their disregard for the God of their fathers caused tremendous pain not only in their personal lives, but in their nation.

As the story winds down at the end of 2 Chronicles, the entire kingdom collapsed. Jerusalem was destroyed. The people were carried off into exile in distant lands. At first glance, it seemed that all hope was lost and nothing great would ever happen again in Israel. Then we come to the last verse of the story, 2 Chronicles 36:23. In that verse God touched the heart of King Cyrus of Persia, a foreign conqueror who was not a follower of the Jewish faith. King Cyrus passed a decree allowing the Jewish people to return to Jerusalem and rebuild their temple. This story, so filled with disappointment and failure, ends with a promise of hope.

Life is often like that for us when we allow God to be at work in our lives. We may face many failures, hardships and difficulties, but when we re-focus on Jesus, the Author and Finisher of our faith, we find hope in the midst of despair. Godly hope does not disappoint. It leads to amazing things we never thought possible.

The book of Ezra follows Chronicles. It picks up the story of the Jewish people in exile. In the opening verses we learn that not only were the Jews allowed to return home and build their temple, but that the very kingdom that enslaved them was now going to help pay for the repairs of the temple. Though some opposition remained, and many hardships still lay ahead, the tide had clearly turned. They were eventually able to rebuild their temple, which remained intact and functioning for hundreds of years.

Many times in our lives God uses the very thing that looked like it would destroy us as an instrument of blessing to us. I am reminded of Ephesians 3:20 which reminds us that Christ is able to do far more abundantly than all that we ask or think, according to the power at work within us. When we are discouraged, we must remember that better days are coming and they will be more amazing than we could ever imagine.

Lord, when we find ourselves in the midst of despair and our days full of trouble, help us remember that better days are coming. Amen.

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This devotional is from the book “Heavenly Mundane” by Dr. Terry W. Dorsett. Dr. Dorsett has been a pastor, church planter, denominational leader and author in New England for more than 20 years. He is a happy husband, a proud father and adoring grandfather. He is a cancer survivor and believes that God works powerfully through times of suffering. He writes extensively and you can find all of his books at:

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Where Are the Missing Leaders?

Nehemiah 3:3-5 - The sons of Hassenaah built the Fish Gate. They built it with beams and installed its doors, bolts, and bars. Next to them Meremoth son of Uriah, son of Hakkoz, made repairs. Beside them Meshullam son of Berechiah, son of Meshezabel, made repairs. Next to them Zadok son of Baana made repairs.

Beside them the Tekoites made repairs, but their nobles did not lift a finger to help their supervisors.

When the Jews returned from exile to Jerusalem, the city was in ruins. One of their first tasks was to rebuild the wall around the city so it would be a safe place to live. Nehemiah 3 lists the community leaders who each adopted a certain section of the wall to rebuild. It is a wonderful picture of what can happen when a group of people band together, each doing their part, to get a job done.

However, there is a very intriguing phrase in verse five about one set of leaders. In verse five it says that the Tekoites made repairs "but their nobles did not lift a finger to help their supervisors." The Tekoites were from the small town of Tekoa, which in historical times was the home of David's mighty men. Though we do not know the whole story, from this verse, and from other places in scripture, it appears that the general populace of Tekoa was made up of hard working people who could be counted on to get the job done. In fact, they are one of only three groups that eventually repaired more than one section of the wall. This indicates that they were not only willing to do their share of the work, but were willing to go beyond the call of duty and do even more than what most other people were willing to do.

Though the Tekoites were hard working, they had leaders that were not so great. For some reason their nobles were not willing to get personally involved in rebuilding the wall. Perhaps they thought it was beneath them? Maybe they were too busy entertaining other nobility? For whatever reason, they were not supportive of what God had led the people to do. Their lack of support was noted at the time and recorded for all history to read. Thousands of years later we still know of their lack of leadership at a crucial time in history.

There are powerful parallels in this passage of scripture and our current culture in North America. Many people are working hard trying to earn a living, raise a family, help their neighbors, and make their communities better places to live. But where are the leaders? They are occupied with other things. They are focused on making more money or increasing their political power. Few leaders seemed interested in joining the common people in making our nation a great place to live. History will record their lack of leadership in this critical hour.

This verse also applies to the Christian sub-culture that exists inside our overall North American culture. As the walls of Christendom have fallen into ruins, we must be bold as we seek to rebuild the spiritual foundations that our society was built on. Far too many Christian leaders are more focused on building their brand or erecting ever larger buildings but fail to interact with communities that are crumbling around them. History will record their lack of leadership in this critical hour.

Lord, help us be leaders and focus on building Your Kingdom and sharing Your Word with others. Amen.

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This devotional is from the book “Heavenly Mundane” by Dr. Terry W. Dorsett. Dr. Dorsett has been a pastor, church planter, denominational leader and author in New England for more than 20 years. He is a happy husband, a proud father and adoring grandfather. He is a cancer survivor and believes that God works powerfully through times of suffering. He writes extensively and you can find all of his books at:




Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Beware of Becoming An Enemy of the Jews

Esther 6:12-13 - Then Mordecai returned to the King’s Gate, but Haman, overwhelmed, hurried off for home with his head covered. Haman told his wife Zeresh and all his friends everything that had happened. His advisers and his wife Zeresh said to him, “Since Mordecai is Jewish, and you have begun to fall before him, you won’t overcome him, because your downfall is certain.”

In the story of Esther, we meet Haman, who was an enemy of the Jews. Haman plotted genocide against the Jews, but had a special hatred for one particular Jew, Mordecai, who refused to bow down to him as he walked by.

In chapter 6 the King realized that Mordecai had once done him a great favor that had not yet been rewarded, so he called Haman in and told him to go honor Mordecai for the unrewarded deed. Though Haman hated Mordecai, he had no choice but to do what the King commanded, even if he loathed every moment of it.

When Haman got home that night he whined to his family about how he had to honor Mordecai that day, the very Jew who had refused to honor Haman. He was expecting sympathy. But their answer to him was startling. That answer is recorded in Esther 6:13 "If Mordecai, before who you have begun to fall, is Jewish, you won't overcome him, because your downfall is certain."

It is amazing that Haman's friends, who had no love for the Jews, recognized that the Jews were special and that Haman would not be able to stand against them. Whether Haman's friends had access to the Old Testament or not, they clearly understood the teaching of Genesis 12:3, where God promised Abraham, "I will bless those who bless you, I will curse those who treat you with contempt, and all the peoples on earth will be blessed through you."

Almost since the beginning of Jewish history as a people, there have been those who sought to destroy them. Time and time again their people have been persecuted, often with great enthusiasm. But through God's supernatural protection, the Jewish people have survived. 

In our modern world the media have somehow painted the Jews as the bad people of the Middle East. Any effort they make to defend themselves from far superior numbers of enemies gets spun to somehow make the Jews the aggressors instead of the victims. We may not always agree with the tactics that the modern nation of Israel uses against her enemies, but we should not be foolish enough to put ourselves in Haman’s place. The Jews are still God's chosen people and if we stand against them, our fall is inevitable.

Lord, help us be a blessing to the Jewish people and remember that if we bless them You will bless us, but if we curse them, then we will be cursed. Amen.

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This devotional is from the book “Heavenly Mundane” by Dr. Terry W. Dorsett. Dr. Dorsett has been a pastor, church planter, denominational leader and author in New England for more than 20 years. He is a happy husband, a proud father and adoring grandfather. He is a cancer survivor and believes that God works powerfully through times of suffering. He writes extensively and you can find all of his books at:





Monday, March 20, 2017

Dangerous Beauty

1 John 2:15- 16 - Do not love the world or the things that belong to the world. If anyone loves the world, love for the Father is not in him. For everything that belongs to the world—the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride in one’s lifestyle—is not from the Father, but is from the world.

When my family lived in Connecticut we often enjoyed visiting the Mystic Aquarium. The aquarium has a number of interesting species of life on display. One wall of the aquarium is filled with small glass boxes that contain unusual frogs. They are brightly colored and look like the kind of creature that would be fun to have in a home aquarium. Except that these particular frogs are very dangerous. They are called dart frogs because indigenous people in Central and South America use the secretions from these frogs as poison on their blow darts. Some varieties will only make a person sick. Others will kill an adult. Just looking at the frogs, one would never know they were so dangerous.

What a powerful lesson to learn in life. Just because something is pretty does not make it safe. In fact, beauty can be deceptive, even dangerous. Far too often we are taken in by people with charming personalities, attractive bodies or eloquent sounding speech, only to be taken advantage of later. Perhaps we get caught up in the story line of a movie, enjoy the rhythm of a great song, or become an expert at a video game that has great graphics or cool special efforts, without realizing the poisonous message that is being put into our minds. Marketers want us to believe that buying their product, or joining particular clubs or groups, will make our lives better, but have we considered if those products or groups will take up so much of our time or money that it affects us in negative ways?

As Christians we must constantly be on our guard for the things that look pretty on the outside, but are poisonous on the inside. Recall the story of the Prodigal Son in Luke 15. He was having the adventure of a lifetime, until all the money ran out. Then the young man longed to eat pig slop. Think of David's one night of indiscretion in 2 Samuel 11, which led to years of pain for his family. There is always pleasure in sin for a season, but then comes destruction. We must not be fooled by how pretty things are, but we must keep our eyes and focus on Jesus, who is the author and finisher of our faith.

Lord, help us keep our hearts and minds pure and not be deceived by the attractive things of this world. Amen.

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This devotional is from the book “Heavenly Mundane” by Dr. Terry W. Dorsett. Dr. Dorsett has been a pastor, church planter, denominational leader and author in New England for more than 20 years. He is a happy husband, a proud father and adoring grandfather. He is a cancer survivor and believes that God works powerfully through times of suffering. He writes extensively and you can find all of his books at: